TEC Blog

TEC Blog

UIHI Success Story: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Report

Success Stories, TEC News
Report provides snapshot of crisis in urban Native communities

Analysis of data in 71 U.S. cities points to much larger problem, inaccurate data

In November 2018, Urban Indian Health Institute (UIHI), a division of Seattle Indian Health Board, released the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) report. This snapshot of data from 71 U.S. cities identified 506 cases of MMIWG and detailed significant challenges in collecting data on the total number of missing or murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives residing in off-reservation areas and outside rural villages. UIHI intends to provide the report as a resource for urban Indian organizations, tribal governments, and legislators.

 

“This report provides a necessary snapshot of the epidemic and is a call-to-action to protect Native women and girls.”

 

– Abigail Echo-Hawk, Director of UIHI and co-author of the report.

 

Annita Lucchesi (Southern Cheyenne descendant), doctoral student and creator of an extensive MMIWG database, co-authored the report with Echo-Hawk. In the course of her research, Lucchesi found some significant issues: a lack of available data on urban Indians, the need for non-tribal law enforcement agencies to coordinate with tribal nations regarding their members and to share data on MMIWG, the racial misclassification of these cases, and inadequate funding for research on violence against urban American Indian and Alaska Native women and girls.

The report has been circulated by major local, national, and international media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, NPR (National), CBC News, The Seattle Times, KUOW, and King 5 News. The communications team shared the report and related information on social media which increased engagement exponentially—it reached over 400,000 people and helped UIHI’s follower base grow by over 2,000 across all social media channels. This report has also been shared by U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), and Juana Majel-Dixon (Pauma Band of Mission Indians), Executive Board Member and Recording Secretary of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) in a press event in Washington, D.C.

The researchers also note that Urban Indian organizations need this information to better inform programming and to advocate for change. They also note that this issue is more than just data. For more information and to view the report, visit the UIHI website.

 

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NIHB Health Policy Fellowship

Training

Growing the Next Generation of Indian Health Advocates

 

National Indian Health Board (NIHB) Health Policy Fellows are a diverse group of talented Native youth who are dedicated to making a difference in their communities.

 

Fellows work directly with their Tribal leadership to identify one priority health issue. Then, with the support of program mentors, Fellows learn how to analyze policy in their issue area, create informed recommendations, and advocate for change.

Health Policy Fellows:

  • Learn about the policies that affect the health of Indian people
  • Grow their team-building and leadership skills
  • Educate their Congressional and Tribal leaders on important health issues
  • Learn tips for being effective advocates and community changemakers
  • Present at national conferences and gatherings
  • Contribute to the development of national and Tribal health programs and policies

Applications are due March 30, 2019 by 11:59 p.m.

Learn More

StoryCenter Digital Storytelling Workshop: Introduction to Digital Storytelling

Training, Webinar

Join StoryCenter on January 14th, 2019 from 10-11 am Pacific to learn the basics of digital storytelling. This free webinar is the first step of your digital storytelling journey and provides a gateway to further explorations of image, sound, and digital media.

Learn about digital storytelling as a workshop process and media arts practice, StoryCenter’s original digital storytelling methodology, and how digital storytelling can be used in public health.

When: January 14, 2019 from 10-11 a.m. Pacific Time

Register

Grants to Enhance Culturally Specific Services for Victims of Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking Program

Grant Opportunities

Grants to Enhance Culturally Specific Services for Victims of Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking Program supports community-based organizations in providing culturally relevant services to victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

View Grant Opportunity

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