TEC Blog

TEC Blog

GPTEC Success Story: Promoting Healing Through Self-Defense: A Response to the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Crisis

Success Stories
The issue of violence in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities is of growing concern. In 2016, the National Institute of Justice reported that more than four out of five AI/AN women and men experience violence in their lifetime.¹ Particularly alarming, are the rates of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Woman and Girls (MMIWG). In the same year, the National Crime Information Center reported there were 5,712 cases of MMIWG, with only 106 having been logged into a Department of Justice Database.²

In response to this growing crisis, the Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center (GPTEC) hosted a self-defense training in partnership with Arming Sisters. Arming Sisters is a non-profit organization founded in 2013 by Patty Stonefish. Patty comes from a long line of matriarchs – Lakota, Russian, and Polish. She has over a decade of martial arts experience.

 

Patty’s day-long training covered topics of self-care, MMIWG, violence against Native American women, body language awareness, trusting intuition, vocalization, and stress responses. She also taught six self-defense moves. All these topics and moves were presented with an emphasis on healing and harnessing the power within oneself.

 

GPTEC received an overwhelming response to offering this training, with twenty tribal community members and GPTEC employees ultimately participating. This has garnered significant interest at the tribal level, with multiple additional trainings being planned in the future. Utilization of GPTEC funds to support implementation of this training also supported provision of the training in settings where funds are unavailable.

Sources:
1. Rosay, A. B. (2016). Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. National Institute of Justice Journal, 277.
2. Lucchesi, A., Echo-Hawk, A. (2019). Missing and murdered indigenous women & girls. Our Bodies, Our Stories.

Patty Stonefish, founder of Arming Sisters
Patty Stonefish, founder of Arming Sisters


Arming Sisters logo For more about Arming Sisters, or to contact Patty: https://armingsisters.org/

 

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Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Research Opportunities in Environmental Health Sciences (R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Grant Opportunities

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is intended to support novel environmental health research in which an unpredictable event or policy change provides a limited window of opportunity to collect human biological samples or environmental exposure data. The primary motivation of the FOA is to understand the consequences of natural and human-made disasters, emerging environmental public health threats, and policy changes in the U.S. and abroad. A distinguishing feature of an appropriate study is the need for rapid review and funding, substantially shorter than the typical NIH grant review/award cycle, for the research question to be addressed and swiftly implemented.

Closing date for applications: Oct. 3, 2022

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Roots 2 A Sovereign Nation Food Summit

Training

Are you ready for the second round of Roots of a Sovereign Nation? The Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council is happy to announce the much anticipated continuation of last year’s food sovereignty summit, held in Billings in August 2018. Join us at the historic Billings Depot for two days of learning and cultural celebration facilitated by Abigail EchoHawk. Hear from powerful voices in the food sovereignty movement, such as activist Winona LaDuke, sharing successes and tools on a breadth of topics. Topics to include nutrition and cancer, farm to school, food as medicine, Tribal food codes, and much more. The summit will be followed by a traditional and contemporary food tasting that you won’t want to miss.

When:
Wednesday, Aug. 14 – Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. MDT

Where:
310 Montana Ave.
Billings, MT 59101

Register

Species Recovery Grants to Tribes

Grant Opportunities

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recognizes the unique importance of many protected species to tribes and values ongoing efforts by tribal nations to conserve and protect species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), 16 U.S.C. 1535. NMFS is authorized to provide Federal assistance to tribes to support conservation programs for listed marine and anadromous species under its jurisdiction. This assistance, provided in the form of grants or cooperative agreements, can be used to support conservation of endangered, threatened, and candidate species or species proposed for listing, as well as post-delisting monitoring of recovered species.

Closing Date: Oct. 31, 2019

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Luce Indigenous Knowledge Fellowship

Grant Opportunities

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations), in partnership with The Henry Luce Foundation (Luce), is proud to launch the Luce Indigenous Knowledge Fellowship. Through this new fellowship program, we will award 10 fellowships of $50,000 each to outstanding Native Americans engaged in meaningful work that benefits Indigenous people and communities in either reservation and/or urban settings. This fellowship is intended to support Native knowledge holders and knowledge makers that embody exceptional creativity, progressive and critical thinking, and the potential to significantly move forward their field in ways that will ultimately lead to broad, transformative impacts for Indigenous communities.

Deadline: September 13, 2019

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