Month September 2019

Month September 2019

OKTEC Success Story: Portraits of Good Health and Wellness In Indian Country

Success Stories
Southern Plains Tribal Health Board – Tribal Epidemiology Center (SPTHB-TEC) presents “Portraits of Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country” made possible through funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SPTHB-TEC is proud to share the stories and impact of four Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country programs located in the urban area of Tulsa, Oklahoma and rural areas of Pawhuska, Oklahoma and Anadarko, Oklahoma. The community programs highlighted are the running/walking club of the Wichita & Affiliated Tribes (Anadarko), Delaware Nation’s “Native Living” nutrition program (Anadarko), Osage Nation’s “Grow, Gather, Hunt Camp” (Pawhuska), and the “Running Strong” & “Sit Less, Move More, Learn Better” programs from the Indian Health Care Resource Center (Tulsa).

 

These projects utilize indigenous methods to promote healthy living and activity with positive life-style changes in their communities through policy, systems, and environmental changes.

 


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For more information on how to become involved or to learn more about these projects, please contact Southern Plains Tribal Health Board’s “Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country” program.

Phone: (405) 652-9200
Web: https://www.spthb.org/

 

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ITCA-TEC Success Story: Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) Workshop

Success Stories, TEC News
On July 18, 2019, the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona Inc. Tribal Epidemiology Center (ITCA TEC) partnered with the Cocopah Indian Tribe to conduct a modified Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) workshop. This pilot workshop was the first of its kind for the Cocopah Tribe and the ITCA TEC. The workshop was conducted in a modified form to take into account the relevant aspects of responding to an emergency on the Cocopah Indian Tribe Reservation. The main themes addressed in the workshop were: community orientation and safety information, survey design in Epi Info and Excel, database construction and basic reports in Epi Info and Excel, interviewing techniques and sensitivity, interview and survey completion live practice and data entry, analysis, and report construction live practice.

This workshop provided a forum for the emergency response partners in Yuma County, such as San Luis Walk-In Clinic, Regional Center for Border Health, Cocopah Environmental Protection Office, Cocopah Tribal Health Maintenance program, Cocopah Police Department, Cocopah Office of Emergency Management, Indian Health Service Fort Yuma Service Unit, Yuma County Public Health Services District, Somerton/Cocopah Fire Department, and Arizona Complete Health. During this workshop, the emergency response partners collaborated, and shared experiences and points of view in order to effectively respond to public health emergencies. Using the modified CASPER questionnaire as a framework, various tips in designing a survey questionnaire and interviewing were discussed and shared among the workshop participants.

 

Eighty seven percent of the workshop participants found the workshop useful to their work responsibilities. Building on the workshop experiences, the emergency response partners are better prepared to collaborate and respond to public health emergencies.

 


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ITCA-TEC-2019-Success-Story-01Figure 1. Cocopah Indian Tribe Office of Emergency Management Manager welcoming the workshop participants.

ITCA-TEC-2019-Success-Story-02Figure 2. An example of inventorying available resources and descriptions from emergency response partners related to a public health emergency in Yuma County.

ITCA-TEC-2019-Success-Story-03Figure 3. Workshop participants discussing necessary data collection and interviewing techniques and sensitivity within a public health emergency response setting.

 

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Save the Date: Tribal Researchers’ Cancer Control Fellowship Program

Training

Save the date: June 7-19, 2020

Sponsored by:
National Cancer Institute
Native American Research Centers for Health (NARCH)
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board

Location:
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board
Portland, Oregon

Topics will include (not limited to):

  • Cancer control study design
  • Cancer epidemiology
  • Cancer screening
  • Cohort studies among American Indians
  • Community-based chronic disease programs
  • Cultural considerations in cancer epidemiology
  • Focus groups
  • Grant writing
  • Implementing a Native comprehensive cancer prevention and control project

To apply:
Applications are encouraged from American Indians and Alaska Natives with a demonstrated interest in cancer prevention and control. Applications will be available in January and due in March.

Accepted Fellows will:

  • Attend a two-week training in June 2020
  • Attend a one-week training in Fall 2020
  • Receive peer and career mentorship to develop and implement cancer control projects
  • Be eligible for paid internships
  • Be connected to a network of experts in cancer control and prevention in Indian Country

For more information and to apply visit http://www.npaihb.org
E-mail Ashley Thomas at athomas@npaihb.org